Giochi dell'Oca e di percorso
(by Luigi Ciompi & Adrian Seville)
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29-01-2017


IL GIOCO DELL’OCA DI MEDUSA

Finalmente abbiamo stampato il Gioco dell’Oca di Medusa! A firma di Susanna Doccioli e di Stefano Verdini. In 100 copie numerate, con una presentazione di Roberta Borsani autrice di “Sul dorso di un’Oca” – Il simbolismo iniziatico del grande gioco e “La danza della vita” – comprendere il femminile attraverso le fiabe. La confezione comprende: 1 tabellone da gioco (aperto 45 x 68 cm, chiuso 22,5 x 22,5 cm) , 6 pedine, 2 dadi, le regole del gioco. La confezione presenta una grafica xilografica stampata a mano.
Il Gioco dell’Oca è il gioco di percorso più antico, lo schema a 63 caselle è quello della tradizione. Il percorso segue un movimento a spirale, può simboleggiare una situazione, una vicenda, un’avventura, lo scorrere del tempo, la vita. Le caselle sono connotate da alcuni simboli, rimasti invariati da secoli. Come nella vita siamo di fronte alla sorte, nel gioco si tirano i dadi, ci sono caselle fortunate e sfortunate.Continuamente si susseguono immagini, sorprese, emozioni… in vista dell’arrivo. Il Gioco dell’Oca è «un labirinto popolare dell’Arte sacra e una raccolta dei principali geroglifici della Grande Opera» (Fulcanelli, Le Dimore Filosofali)."Questo ruolo iniziatore dell’oca è di certo estremamente antico […] Ne fa fede lo straordinario successo del Gioco dell’Oca, “ripreso” dai Greci, come si diceva al tempo di C. Perrault. E’ un gioco sostanzialmente simbolico; se ne attribuisce l’invenzione a Palamede, inventore anche degli scacchi e della dama. Il gioco consiste nel far avanzare una pedina, a seconda del numero tirato dai dadi, sulle caselle di una spirale che si avvolge verso l’interno da sinistra a destra. Ogni 9 caselle c’è un’oca diversa, fino alla sessantatreesima, che raffigura il giardino dell’oca. La prima casella è una porta o un portico. Quindi si alternano immagini simboliche, dei ponti, una locanda, un pozzo, un labirinto, la prigione, la morte. Alcuni di questi ostacoli obbligano a tornare indietro, e il giocatore attraversa così un terreno insidioso e accidentato. Si tratta senza dubbio di un gioco iniziatico, ma se ne è perduta la chiave. Eliphas Lévy vi vedeva una variante dei tarocchi, di cui riconosceva nei geroglifici le immagini tradizionali" (Jean Paul Clébert).

25-12-2016

BUON NATALE E FELICE ANNO NUOVO A TUTTI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


15-07-2016

Il nuovo libro di Giovanni Pelosini
TAROCCHI. GLI SPECCHI DELL’INFINITO
Storia, Filosofia, Simboli, Alchimia, Cartomanzia pratica

Finalmente in tutte le librerie il nuovo classico della cultura tarologica mondiale: l’enciclopedica Opera Omnia, teorica e pratica, per conoscere “tutto” sui Tarocchi. Per i neofiti, la visione completa del mondo dei Tarocchi presentata in modo semplice e chiaro. Per i cultori della materia, un punto di riferimento fondamentale. Per tutti, una guida per comprendere se stessi e interpretare il mondo. Un grande libro (cm 17 x 24), illustrato b/n, 486 pagine, 691 note a piè pagina, ricchissima bibliografia e sitografia, indice analitico.

Editrice Hermatena, maggio 2016 – ISBN 978-88-97371-87-8 (G. Pelosini).



14-04-2016

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
The Many Guises of Classic Games
By Christopher Chabris
April 14, 2016 11:28 a.m. ET.
Rebranding board games with new themes is a practice that dates back centuries, as a new exhibit called ‘The Royal Game of the Goose’ shows Lots of today’s board games are just jazzed-up variations on classics. We have not only the familiar old Risk but Game of Thrones Risk, Doctor Who Risk and The Walking Dead Risk. Monopoly has too many editions to count, from Monopoly to 2014 FIFA World Cup Brasil Monopoly. Is all of this just another instance of modern marketing and branding gone wild?
Actually, no. It’s a practice with deep roots in the long history of board games, as we learn from “The Royal Game of the Goose,” an exhibition at the Grolier Club in New York City that that presents over 70 versions of one game from the past 400 years. Goose is a game of pure luck, like Chutes and Ladders, in which players roll dice and advance along a 63-space spiral track, trying to be the first to reach the center. Spaces marked with geese bestow bonuses, such as extra moves, while those marked with hazards (like a prison or a well) impose penalties, such as being stuck in place. The game often involved stakes, with each player contributing an amount and the winner taking the entire pool. Board games are perfect for continual commercial exploitation, because they incorporate two distinct elements: the rules and the theme. The rules are the essence of a game and make it different from all others, but themes can be interchangeable. Monopoly took off with a theme of 1920s Atlantic City, but if you never played the original game, you would be just as happy with a version set in Ocean City or even Trenton. Game designers argue that a close match of rules and theme—a stock market game where you buy and sell certificates rather than roll dice, for example—makes a game great. But game publishers and buyers don’t seem to care that much. Classic abstract games like Go and Scrabble don’t really accommodate multiple themes, because the playing pieces are simple stones or letters and the playing space is just a grid of locations. But even chess can take on new themes. Though the board never changes, the pieces do reflect the culture and time in which they are made. That has led to sets branded with “Star Wars” and “The Simpsons.”
The earliest known mention of Goose was in Renaissance Italy in 1480, and from there the game spread throughout Europe. Along the way, its name and artwork, and the iconography of the special spaces, were all adapted to new environments and concerns. France saw variations called the Royal Game of Cupid, the Game of Fortifications and the Game of Paris. In 19th-century Britain, versions like Complete Voyage Round the World and The Pleasures of Astronomy aimed to be more educational. Around the same time, companies started branding the game to advertise dolls, gas lamps and soda. This last Goose example was sold by the Canadian distributor in 1934 as The Game of Health. It promoted the beverage as a “pure and healthy carbonated liquid.” Today’s SpongeBob Connect Four seems quaint by comparison.




30-03-2016

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
‘The Royal Game of the Goose: Four Hundred Years of Printed Board Games’ Review
A winning survey of the many variations of a centuries-old game.
By Edward Rothstein
March 30, 2016 5:51 p.m. ET
New York
The Royal Game of the Goose: Four Hundred Years of Printed Board Games
The Grolier Club
Through May 14
Many dangers must be overcome on a long and winding road before you can claim any rewards. Along the way you might be distracted by the ribald pleasures of an inn or stumble into a deep well; you might fall prey to Poverty or be locked up in Newgate; if you travel far, you might be shipwrecked; if you are inattentive, your career might end. But if you manage to make it to the end . . . well, there might be a pot of money awaiting, or a hot-air balloon flight, a military medal, or religious salvation. Such, at any rate, are some rewards imagined over more than 400 years, as a player finally reaches space 63 of the Royal Game of the Goose.
Until I saw the mind-opening exhibition now at the Grolier Club (through May 14) I had no idea what the Royal Game of the Goose even was, let alone that it is one of the most venerable and varied board games in the world. (Next Tuesday afternoon, the Grolier will host an international colloquium about some of the game’s classic competitors.) Goose may have originated in 15th-century Italy; by the 16th century it had earned so much respect that Francesco de Medici, the Grand Duke of Tuscany, gave it as a gift to King Philip II of Spain. In both countries it is still widely played. For two centuries it was popular in England as well. And according to Adrian Seville, the exhibition’s curator, who selected these examples from his own collection, it remains “part of the national psyche” in the Low Countries, where “dozens of new games” appear every year.
The original concept was so simple it became a framework for centuries of transformations. Roll two dice and move counters along a 63-space path. Land on the picture of a goose and you double your throw. Land on a hazard—such as a Bridge, an Inn, a Well or Death—and you are penalized. Each incarnation of the game altered goals and obstacles, turning the game’s pre-modern sojourn into a map of grander ambitions and dangers—a portrait of a culture and its time. More than 70 examples on display from England, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain and the U.S. offer that scheme and elaborate variations. A traditional c. 1840 British version lays out the path within the outline of a goose’s body but another British game from 1855 celebrates the growing empire with a tour of the nation’s colonies and possessions. An early 20th-century French game champions musical pedagogy with each space offering another lesson. And in 1956, a version from the Washington, D.C. Democratic Women’s Day Committee means to put a Democrat in the White House (that year, it worked only in the game). Jules Verne wrote a justly neglected novel about Goose, “The Will of an Eccentric” (1899), in which the entire U.S. became a game board.
But why a goose? Why 63 spaces? As Mr. Seville points out in the vivid catalog, in its original 15th-century form the game was numerologically suggestive. Goose images appear every nine spaces—a holy number, the Trinity of Trinities (in one instance here, the Goose image resembles the Christological symbol of the Pelican). The winning space, 63, also had a salvationary tinge. In Medieval thought, every seven years a transformation took place in human life; the age of 63, marking the ninth such milestone, possessed, as one writer said in 1650, “the most considerable fatality.” It was known as the “Grand Climacteric”—a critical age in human life. Afterward, peace and wisdom might be expected—along with the right to claim the stakes in the Royal Game of the Goose.
Such associations help explain why the game might have been considered a suitable royal gift by the Medici Court. It was a representation of the religious life: an allegory. In fact, it seems to be rough ancestor to Bunyan’s “Pilgrim’s Progress” (1678)—which probably should have itself been turned into a board game, as the Pilgrim proceeds through the Slough of Despond and the Valley of Humiliation, finally crossing the River of Death to reach the Celestial City.
These associations also help explain why so many of the games here are serious, even pious. Ideals are at stake. An 1855 game from Rhode Island envisions a pastoral American homestead with humming beehives. Moral education was another ambition. In an 1800 British game, “The Mansion of Happiness,” the geese are virtues, the hazards vices; land on Idleness and you must proceed to Poverty. The game could even model national or “universal” history. In an 1814 English game, each space is accompanied by readings linking it to a historical event. More modest historical games have been shaped around ballooning (1784, France) or inventions (1894, Holland) with Edison at the winning space.
And there are a few instances of sheer playfulness. “The Gifts of Youth—The Little Game of Love” (1713, France) uses two circular paths; females take one, males the other. Land on Inconstancy,
illustrated with a butterfly, and the male must be tied to his chair by a female, using her garter. Land on Jealousy, and the player must hide behind a curtain and miss turns. And if both male and female land at a central space at which the paths “kiss,” they are triumphantly “joined together.” This is not quite what the Medici Court had in mind with the Royal Game of the Goose, but these players presumably have a long way to go before their Grand Climacteric.
Mr. Rothstein is the Journal’s Critic at Large.

21-03-2016

"The Royal Game of the Goose. 400 Years of Printed Board Games."
Exhibition at the Grolier Club 24February to 14 May 2016

21-03-2016

"The Royal Game of the Goose. 400 Years of Printed Board Games."
Exhibition at the Grolier Club 24February to 14 May 2016

02-03-2016

NEW YORK: THE GROLIER CLUB, 2016.
Adrian Seville: "The Royal Game of the Goose. 400 Years of Printed Board Games."
Exhibition at the Grolier Club 24February to 14 May 2016.(Flickr).



25-02-2016

NEW YORK: THE GROLIER CLUB, 2016.
Adrian Seville: "The Royal Game of the Goose. 400 Years of Printed Board Games."
Exhibition at the Grolier Club 24February to 14 May 2016.

THE NEW YORK TIMES
A Quirky Board Game With Versions Spanning 400 Years.
By EVE M. KAHN FEB. 25, 2016

Adrian Seville has bought hundreds of board games, but he has hardly any interest in playing them. A retired university administrator living outside London, Dr. Seville has focused on collecting variants of the Game of the Goose, which was invented in the 15th century and remains in production. While its rules may be too simplistic for his tastes — players roll dice and try to beat one another to the 63rd square — he nonetheless described the collecting process as “highly addictive.”
The Grolier Club in Manhattan has borrowed about 70 of Dr. Seville’s finds for an exhibition, “The Royal Game of the Goose: Four Hundred Years of Printed Board Games,” running through May 14. On the boards’ tracks, players maneuver among squares that allow for leaps ahead or lost turns or slogs backward. The squares and the borders on Dr. Seville’s games are printed with images including everything from happy aristocratic lovers to Richard M. Nixon, cannibals, brutalized slaves, shipwrecks, brown envelopes with cash bribes and advertisements for dolls, tires, biscuits, breath mints and gas lighting.
Given the diversity of themes, Dr. Seville said, “All human life is here.” He has even seen the Game of the Goose adapted to promote sewage pumps. “Some are so dull that they’re actually interesting,” he said.
He has paid up to thousands of dollars apiece for the games, which turn up widely at auction houses including Sotheby’s, Bonhams and Bloomsbury. He has posted his collection at giochidelloca.it, a website he set up with a fellow enthusiast, Luigi Ciompi. At the Grolier Club, a few of the games are laid out horizontally under glass; visitors can ask for playing pieces and dice at the front desk and try their hand at racing along the squares.
Through March 6, the Bodelian Libraries at the University of Oxford are displaying board games recently donated by the collector Richard Ballam in the show “Playing With History.” This spring, the V&A Museum of Childhood in London will borrow from Dr. Seville for the exhibition “Game Plan: 500 Years of Board Games.”



18-01-2016

Adrian Seville’s Exhibition at the Grolier Club of New York - February 24 through May 14, 2016

The Royal Game of the Goose - Four centuries of a classic board game

The Royal Game of the Goose is one of the earliest printed board games, going back to the Middle Ages—and one of the simplest: just roll the dice and move along its spiral track. This graphically vibrant exhibition at the Grolier Club brings together over 70 of these games, almost all from the rich international collection of Adrian Seville, game board historian and Emeritus Professor, City University, London. These beautiful and striking printed games are hardly known in the U.S., and this unique exhibition provides deep insights into the cultural history of Europe, with some fascinating glimpses of America, too.

This classic game has been used as a template for thousands of variant games throughout Europe. They range from the earliest educational games of the 17th century to games of advertising, politics and propaganda of the modern era.

Though the games are simple to play, most are not for young children. Indeed, several princes of Europe are significant in its early history. So, here is a unique early 17th century print of the Game of Cupid, from the fabled rue Montorgueil in Paris, whose numerology represents the union of male and female – and whose track is laid out on a fine crowned serpent to warn against sin! Another French print, the Gifts of Youth, is a party game with forfeits: a young man landing on “inconstancy” must submit to being tied to his chair by his partner’s garter.

Some games celebrate science and invention: here is Benjamin Franklin in Paris witnessing “the first balloon raised in the atmosphere by means of inflammable air”, while a Dutch game of the 19th century showcases Edison, prominently surrounded by his electric light bulbs.

Others are from the early days of advertising. A game in the shape of the newly-built Eiffel Tower promotes luxury French dolls but warns against buying a cheap German import – the broken doll appears on the “death” space, an early example of “knocking” copy.

One section of the exhibition is devoted to Images of America. A meticulously-engraved game of the mid-17th century shows remarkable images of the early Native American peoples. Another celebrates the running of the Southern blockade by British ships during the American Civil War. And a truly incredible novel by Jules Verne provides the basis for the Noble Game of the United States, in which the possible benefactors of a Chicago millionaire’s will battle for the money by competing in a gigantic Goose game ranging across the States of the Nation.

The final case of the exhibition presents some games of human life arranged for play – do you have what it takes to progress from Errand Boy to successful Banker and Valued Citizen?

As befits the Grolier Club, there is a full range of printing techniques from early woodcut, to fine engraving and modern lithography. Some games were issued as broadside sheets, others are folded on linen or on pasteboard. Not all the games follow the classic template exactly but all can trace their existence to the parent Game of the Goose.

CATALOGUE

A fully illustrated color catalogue will accompany the exhibition, designed by Rob Banham (Reading University, England), with an introduction by Past President of the Grolier Club William H. Helfand. The 151-page catalogue will be available in early February from Oak Knoll Books: orders@oakknoll.com; www.oakknoll.com.

PUBLIC EVENTS: COLLOQUIUM: SOME BEAUTIFUL BOARD GAMES

Tuesday, April 5, 2016, 1:00 PM-5:00 PM, reception to follow.

Complementing the exhibition, the Colloquium showcases the great diversity and appeal of board games through the ages and across the world.

Speakers: Irving Finkel (British Museum); Ann Dunn-Vaturi (Metropolitan Museum of Art); Alex de Voogt (American Museum of Natural History); Adrian Seville (City University, London); Andrea Immel (Cotsen Library, University of Princeton); Margaret K. Hofer (New-York Historical Society).

Registration is $75 per person, $25 for students.

FREE GUIDED TOURS will be arranged throughout the period of the exhibition. For details, please contact the Grolier Club.

VISITING THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY 10022
212-838-6690
www.grolierclub.org

Hours: Monday – Saturday, 10 am to 5 pm
Admission: Exhibitions are open to the public free of charge
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION please contact
Jennifer Sheehan, Exhibitions Manager jsheehan@grolierclub.org
(Index of Ephemera News).



01-01-2016

NEW YORK: THE GROLIER CLUB, 2016.
Adrian Seville: "The Royal Game of the Goose. 400 Years of Printed Board Games."
Exhibition at the Grolier Club 24February to 14 May 2016.

This exhibition of four centuries of the Game of the Goose and its derivatives is drawn almost entirely from my own collection in Chislehurst, ten miles south east of London. They represent approximately ten percent of the collection, so choosing items for inclusion presented its challenges. My collection grew out of a love affair with Italy when, on holiday in the 1970s, I found two splendid games in a provincial flea market and, as collectors will know, it only takes one more to make a collection! My late wife, Joyce, was an enthusiastic collaborator and was responsible for finding several of the more important games in the collection. Also on view in this exhibition are two very early games, courtesy of The Morgan Library & Museum, and a few important games kindly loaned by John Spear of Tennessee from his specialist collection of pre-1900 English and American games.
The collection has been developed as a research base for my post-retirement work on the cultural history of board games. It includes examples from all periods, covering a wide range of themes. The heart of the collection is the group of French seventeenth-, eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century games, which bears comparison
with those assembled at the end of the nineteenth century by Baron Ferdinand
de Rothschild at Waddesdon Manor, Buckinghamshire. In both collections, the emphasis is on the large-format copper engravings produced in Paris, with representation of a wide range of themes. A more demanding comparison is with the impressive collection of printed board games assembled by that remarkable example of Victorian achievement, Lady Charlotte Schreiber (1812–95) and now held in the British Museum. Not only was she a prodigious collector, but (as Lady Charlotte Guest) she was renowned for translating the Mabinogion from the Middle Welsh. She made a fine porcelain collection, now in the Victoria & Albert Museum; also collections of playing cards and of fans, both now in the British Museum. The collection of about 130 printed board games that she assembled late in her life contains some astonishing and unique material, beginning with Italian examples from the late 1500s and continuing with some of the most beautiful French and German games. My aim, only partly achieved, has been to match the range and quality of her collection pre-1900 and to carry this forward into the twentieth century. My collection includes about 200 French games, 100 British games, over 50 each from Germany, Italy and the Netherlands/Belgium, and a few games from other countries. Games from Spain are underrepresented in what is otherwise a reasonably comprehensive selection from the thousands of single-track dice games in existence.
Information on all the games in my collection, together with many others, is accessible on the dedicated giochidelloca web site at www.giochidelloca.it set up by my friend and colleague Dr. Luigi Ciompi in Italy, who himself has an important collection of printed games. Thousands of games are available for free image and information download from the site, which also hosts a comprehensive bibliography.
Throughout this catalogue, references to particular games are given in the form Ciompi/Seville 1234, which gives the game code number to be used on the site’s search page, http://www.giochidelloca.it/ricerca.php.
This exhibition would never have happened but for my friend Gretchen Adkins, who introduced me to the Grolier Club and has been immensely supportive throughout.
Bill Helfand has been a great example of enthusiastic and expert collecting in the field of ephemera. George Ong’s tireless expertise as editor of the catalogue has been invaluable. Other good friends in the Grolier Club are too numerous to mention.
Adrian Seville

25-12-2015

BUON NATALE E FELICE ANNO NUOVO A TUTTI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

10-12-2015

STROUHAL, Ernst: "Die Welt im Spiel. Atlas der Spielbaren Landkarten." Christian Brandstaetter Verlag. Universitat fur Angewandte Kunst, Wien. 2015.

Eine besondere Form der Reise ist jene mit dem Finger über die Landkarte. Der Vorteil: das Ziel ist kaum mehr als eine Handbreit entfernt und Kosten spielen keine Rolle. Der Autor Ernst Strouhal präsentierte seine prächtige Sammlung historischer Reisespiele aus Europa, Nordamerika und Japan vom 18. bis zum 20. Jahrhundert, „Die Welt im Spiel. Atlas der spielbaren Landkarten“, im Lichthof der Akademie für Angewandte Kunst in Wien.
Die fantasievollen Spielpläne laden zu unterhaltsamen und aufregenden Expeditionen durch unbekannte Städte und Kontinente, in exotische Länder und fremde Welten, durch die Geschichte oder rund um die Welt ein. So ist die stellvertretende Verlagsleiterin Elisabeth Stein besonders stolz auf dieses Projekt: „Mich hat von Anfang an der Gedanke elektrisiert, dass es ein Buch sein wird, das mehr als ein Buch ist, ein Buch, das man lesen und aber auch spielen kann. Ich denke, in Zeiten zunehmender Digitalisierung haben gerade solche Bücher, die Objekte sind, solche Bücher, die nur als gedruckte, schön ausgestattete Werke funktionieren, eine Berechtigung und eine Zukunft.“
Autor Ernst Strouhal weiß nach der langen und ausführlichen Recherche jetzt jedenfalls viel über spielbare Landkarten: „Das Spiel vereinfacht die Welt. Es entfaltet seine Kraft erst in der Differenz zum Leben und der Wirklichkeit.“ Im Spiel reist man zu Fuß, mit dem Fahrrad oder per Schiff, mit dem Flugzeug oder im Ballon, in Zeppelin, Pferdekutschen oder Eisenbahnen. Es wird gewürfelt, der Zufall regiert, die Reise auf dem Papier ist unwägbar wie das Leben selbst. Mit den detaillierten Kommentaren über Gestaltung und Regeln ist dem Autor eine kleine Kulturgeschichte der Reisespiele gelungen. Das Schönste daran: das Buch ist lesbar und spielbar zugleich!

Ernst Strouhal dokumentiert 63 historische Spiele: Sie ermöglichen es dem Leser, sich auf wunderbare imaginäre Reisen durch Zeit und Raum zu begeben.
Es gibt Bücher und Bücher. Es gibt Bücher, die mit ihrem Erscheinen das Medium des Buches neu erfinden, indem sie es transformieren und mit anderen Medien verschmelzen, ohne sich in ihnen zu verlieren. Ernst Strouhals Die Welt im Spiel ist ein solches Buch. Sein Untertitel Atlas der spielbaren Landkarten verrät bereits, in welche Richtung das Buch sich selbst überschreitet: Die in ihm versammelten Landkarten sind nicht nur lesbar, sondern auch spielbar. Landkarten sind sie im buchstäblichen und im metaphorischen Sinn – als Karten geografischer und imaginärer Räume.

Durchgehend Raritäten
Das Buch ist in jeder Hinsicht größer, als es sich auf den ersten Blick gibt. Gedruckt im Format 24 x 32 cm, besteht es aus zwei Teilen, die durch den Bucheinband miteinander verbunden und vollständig geöffnet beinahe einen Meter breit sind. Der rechte Teil enthält doppelseitige Reproduktionen von Brettspielen, der linke deren Dokumentationen, Spielregeln und Kommentare. Dieser gesamte linke Teil lässt sich aus dem Bucheinband herausklappen und ebenfalls doppelseitig neben dem rechten öffnen. Der wiederum, deutlich dicker, ist in offener Fadenbindung gebunden, die ein vollständiges Aufschlagen der Doppelseiten ermöglicht. Diese werden dadurch zu Spielbrettern. Die Spiele lassen sich so nicht nur studieren, sondern auch spielen. Sie stammen aus Europa, Nordamerika und Japan vom 18. bis ins 20. Jahrhundert. Viele davon waren einst populär und sind heute vergessen. Durchgehend handelt es sich um Raritäten, zusammengetragen und zur Verfügung gestellt von leidenschaftlichen Sammlerinnen und Sammlern, von Museen und weiteren Institutionen rund um die Welt, deren Namen in der Danksagung und im Bildnachweis genannt sind. 63 Spiele sind es, eine Anspielung auf die Anzahl der Felder im klassischen Gänsespiel, dessen Form die meisten dieser Spiele haben.

Die Gliederung
Strouhal hat aus ihnen fünf Gruppen und das heißt hier zugleich auch fünf Kapitel gebildet, deren gemeinsames Element die Reise oder allgemeiner noch eine bestimmte Form fortschreitender Bewegung ist: "Durch die Städte", "In ferne Länder", "Über Berg und Tal", "Durch Zeit und Raum", "Reise durchs Leben". "Der Motor der Bewegung ist der Würfel, der Zufall regiert, die Reise am Papier ist unwägbar wie das Leben selbst", heißt es im Vorwort. Die inhaltliche Gliederung und formale Gestaltung verraten eine weitere Richtung der Selbstüberschreitung. Das Buch wird hier nicht nur zur Spielesammlung, sondern auch zum Ausstellungskatalog: auf der einen, rechten Seite die Ausstellungsobjekte, auf der anderen, linken die Begleittexte, die sich auch wegklappen lassen. Strouhal ist ein erfahrener Ausstellungskurator, der etwa die thematisch verwandte Ausstellung Spiele der Stadt. Glück, Gewinn und Zeitvertreib mitkuratiert hat, die 2012/2013 im Wien-Museum zu sehen war. Hier ist er Kurator einer Ausstellung, die so nicht stattgefunden hat und sich das Buch als alternativen Ausstellungsraum erschließt. In diesem Sinne ist es eine kuratorische Entscheidung von großer Tragweite, die Auswahl und Reihenfolge der Ausstellungsobjekte mit einem Spiel zu beschließen, das den Titel "Die Reise ins Himmelreich" trägt. Wo der Zufall entscheidet, ob die Seele in den Himmel oder in die Hölle gelangt, ist der Ernst des Lebens infrage gestellt. Den Glücksspielern, denen Hieronymus Bosch in seinem Garten der Lüste ein eigenes, im Buch abgebildetes Höllenabteil reserviert hat, bleibt damit zugleich ein Funke Hoffnung. Nicht dieser ist es jedoch, der das Feuer der Spielleidenschaft anfacht: "Das Leben als Spiel betrachtet ist ein Leben in Immanenz", sagt Strouhal. Das heißt immer auch, es ist frei von jeglichem Zweck, dadurch jedoch nicht automatisch sinnlos.

Heraustreten aus dem eigentlichen Leben.
Bei der Zweckfreiheit ist an die Analogie zu denken, die der Soziologe und Kulturtheoretiker Georg Simmel zwischen Kunst und Spiel beobachtet hat. Spiele haben etwas von jener Zweckmäßigkeit ohne Zweck, die Immanuel Kant zufolge die Schönheit auszeichnet. Vor allem bilden sie gegenüber dem Alltag eine eigene Sphäre. Wie der Kulturhistoriker Johan Huizinga in seinem Homo Ludens, einem Klassiker der Spieltheorie, sagt, ist das Spiel nicht das "gewöhnliche" oder das "eigentliche" Leben. "Es ist vielmehr das Heraustreten aus ihm." Umso bemerkenswerter ist es, dass es Strouhal gelingt, die Spiele in jenes gewöhnliche Leben einzubetten, aus dem sie heraustreten. Seine luziden Kommentare und sein einleitender Essay erzählen wie im Vorbeigehen eine kleine, materialreiche Kulturgeschichte dieser Spiele. Es waren, wie Strouhal betont, Spiele für Erwachsene, die spielerisch belehrten, aber auch um Geld gespielt wurden. Sie kommunizieren in vielfältiger Weise mit dem Alltag, den sie hinter sich lassen. Strouhals Buch hält, was sein Titel verspricht: Es verklärt nicht die "Welt als Spiel", sondern rekonstruiert in plastischer Weise die Spiele selbst und die Welt, die sich in ihnen zeigt.
(Ingo Zechner, 15.11.2015)



15-11-2015

LA CONTRADA DELL'OCA
EL ZUC DE OCJE PAR FURLAN
Siamo una piccola fattoria sociale a Fanna, piccolo comune in provincia di Pordenone. Abbiamo realizzato un grandissimo gioco dell'oca, praticabile per tutte le persone, anche coloro che soffrono di qualche disturbo, perchè totalmente libera da barriere e coloro che lamentano problemi di deambulazione possono usare i due scooterini che consentono di effettuare il percorso senza sforzo. Questo gioco è lungo 600 metri ed è stato realizzato intorno al pascolo degli animali, così i bambini (lo scorso anno ne sono venuti oltre 1.500 in visita didattica) lanciando i grandi dadi di gommapiuma possono giocare e nel frattempo ammirare il paesaggio, il bosco e gli animali al pascolo. I 63 quadri di 1 mt x 1 mt sono stati realizzati dall'Accademia di Brera e dall'Associazione dei pittori "Dalle terre di Giotto e dell'Angelico" che ha sede a Vicchio nella casa natale di Giotto.
Per l'Expo abbiamo realizzato, grazie ad un contributo della regione Friuli VG, un gioco dell'Oca tutto incentrato sulla corretta alimentazione dei bambini, con opere di Maria Distefano, bravissima pittrice di Venezia e sempre grazie alla insostituibile collaborazione dell'Associazione dei pittori "Dalle terre di Giotto e dell'Angelico". I quadri sono stati riprodotti su banner e portati al Museo del Bambino della Rotonda della Besana di Milano, a fine ottobre in collegamento con l'Expo, e per una settimana i bambini delle scuole di Milano hanno potuto giocare a questo gioco dell'oca (ne sono passati quasi 2.000).
Visto poi che da sempre operiamo per la salvaguardia delle lingue minoritarie e delle tradizioni locali, abbiamo pensato di creare una cordata insieme ad un'altra associazione friulana molto attiva in queste attività di divulgazione della lingua friulana "L'Istitut Ladin Furlan prè Checo Placeran", alla provincia di Udine e alla regione Friuli VG e tutti insieme abbiamo realizzato questo gioco da tavolo interamente in lingua friulana e lo stiamo diffondendo gratuitamente nelle scuole elementari della Regione. Le immagini sono realizzate da Otto D'Angelo, pittore di 93 anni sempre giovane dentro e che in tuti questi anni ha dipinto ogni possibile angolo e scorcio del Friuli, insieme a giochi, attrezzi, usi e gesti del Friuli di una volta. La plancia è opera di Maria Distefano.
Un gioco dell'oca in friulano perchè giocando i bambini possano utilizzare termini ed usare la loro lingua madre, perchè in questo modo possono rafforzare le loro radici e crescere sereni ed aperti a qualsiasi conoscenza ed incontro, perchè chi conosce e rispetta le proprie tradizioni non ha paura di incontrarne altre e diverse.
Paolo Paron


01-11-2015

NEW YORK: THE GROLIER CLUB, 2016.
Adrian Seville:
"The Royal Game of the Goose. 400 Years of Printed Board Games."
Exhibition at the Grolier Club 24 February to 14 May, 2016.

The Grolier Club has not mounted an exhibition on board games in its 132-year history.
The games in this exhibition are engraved or lithographed works on paper that are fine prints, exhibitions of which were even more significant than those of rare books in the early years of the club. But they also fit into the category of innovative
and never-before-exhibited materials first shown at the Grolier Club, as various as “the first American showing of commercial posters as artistic works, Whistler’s Amsterdam etchings, bookplates, Near Eastern books and manuscripts, and bronze statues of movements cast by Degas from wax statuettes.”1 Thus, these board games are particularly suited for an exhibition here.
The Game of the Goose (in French, the jeu de l’oie) is the one of the oldest known printed board games; early records of its existence in Italy date as far back as the late fifteenth century, and it appears in England as early as 1597. Like so many things, the jeu de l’oie can be played at multiple levels: children play it to win, caring little for the journey which, like so many games of chance, requires no particular skill or talent. But, on another level, scholars mine the game for its cultural evidence, elements of social behavior and historical cues. Adrian Seville’s superb collection, which now numbers more than 400 examples of the Goose game, falls squarely in this latter group, as the range of games in his diverse collection will show. Dr. Seville, the exhibition’s
curator, has long been meticulous in his search for these rare games, striving to build a broadly representative collection among so many similar games that have appeared in Europe over the past 500 years, as well as, more recently, some even produced in the United States. They are exhibited here in examples from England, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, the Netherlands and Spain.
One example — The New Game of Human Life [Game 68] — is quite well known. The version on display here is a variation of a classic French game and comes with a recommendation to play with a spinner rather than a set of dice. Featuring the seven ages of man (from infancy to old age), there are special rules, among them what happens if the dice, if used, turn up twin sixes, or what hazards might befall a player (and the curious reasons for landing upon them). Captain Cook, Alexander
Pope, William Pitt and Isaac Newton (in place of François-Marie Arouet, more commonly known as Voltaire) are among many notable figures found on the board along with the Prince Regent, who would later ascend the throne as George IV. His image here — a crude and unflattering caricature — reflects the politics of the game’s designer with regard to the future King. Who knew that so much could be learned from a simple board game?
The erudition and breadth of board-game knowledge shown by Dr. Seville are most impressive and a welcome addition to the Grolier Club’s history. Perhaps, too, this exhibition will serve as a guide for future exhibitions, while offering visitors access to an important collection that is much more than the sum of its parts.
William H. Helfand
Grolier Club President (2006–2009)

20-01-2015

Il 20 gennaio il Prof. Adrian Seville ha preso parte alla manifestazione "Journeys Through Bookland: Explorations in Children’s Literature" presentando la sua relazione "Early Children’s Books as Board Games: A Different Way of “Reading” the Story".

(The Grolier Club of New York).


07-01-2015

NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE NOUS SOMMES TOUS CHARLIE

10-12-2014

Exposition du 10/12/2014 au 26/04/2015

Jeux et Merveilles
Singuliers, rares ou précieux, les objets ludiques présentés révèlent l’univers d’un grand collectionneur contemporain, favorisant ainsi la connaissance et la rêverie des visiteurs.
Artiste passionné par les cartes à jouer et le jeu en général, Jean Verame a constitué sur plus de quarante ans, un extraordinaire et éclectique cabinet d’amateur. La sélection de près de cent cinquante ensembles, toutes époques et tous pays confondus, met en avant leur caractère admirable. L’art de collectionner et le plaisir du jeu sont ici intimement liés.

Carte de Tarot peinte sur fond or du 15e siècle italien, premières cartes de joueurs joliment gravées et colorées, exceptionnel Minchiate (tarot de 97 cartes) parisien du 18è s., cartes apaches en cuir, cartes péruviennes gravées sur plaques d’argent, statuette mexicaine représentant un joueur de Tlachtli, marqueur de cribbage inuit sculpté dans une dent de morse, table de jeux parisienne en bois précieux, Cavagnole, Biribi royal, coffrets de quadrille, paire de dés anthropomorphes, jeu d'échecs injouables créé par Jean Verame, l'artiste, en 1985, boules de pétanques carrées contemporaines... Tous les trésors de ce fureteur inspiré ont de quoi faire rêver !
Une partie de la collection de Jean Verame s’est constituée au gré de la dispersion d’ensembles français et étrangers. Certains jeux présents dans l’exposition en témoignent.
Désireux de partager ses découvertes Jean Verame est l’auteur de plusieurs ouvrages richement illustrés sur les cartes et le jeu. Le dernier en date a pour titre : Les très beaux objets du jeu, (Editions Face & Dos, 2014) préfacé par Jean-Marie Lhôte.

Jean Verame, l’artiste et le collectionneur
La quête de l’extraordinaire est une des principales motivations de ce collectionneur hors norme. Sans doute, ces objets si singuliers dont ils s’entourent ont-ils aussi nourri son travail d’artiste. Lui-même définit volontiers son rapport à sa collection de jeux comme sa « prise de terre » complémentairement à sa démarche artistique qui serait sa « prise de ciel ». Les lignes de force, les couleurs franches, en aplat bleu, noir et rouge des figures de cartes qui le fascinent depuis l’enfance, trouvent comme un écho chez ce peintre des déserts. L’aire de jeu, ici, est sans limite avec des règles élaborées par lui seul, jour après jour pour une formidable partie qu’il joue avec lui-même !
« C’est au moment où je me suis libéré du strict enfermement dans l’atelier, où j’ai commencé à explorer des espaces réels pour m’exprimer que j’ai été attiré par l’histoire des jeux et des objets qui en découlent. C’est là que j’ai découvert un espace ludique, pleinement gratifiant, excitant ». Jean Verame, 2003.
C’est bien toutes les dimensions artistiques d’un plasticien collectionneur, amateur de cartes à jouer, de jeux et de silences, que cette exposition donne à voir.



07-12-2014

"TAROCCHI, SCACCHI, ENIGMI: PASSATEMPI CORTESI E POPOLARI NEI FONDI DELLA BUB"

6 dicembre 2014 - 31 gennaio 2015 (Atrio Aula Magna)
La Mostra è stata preparata e allestita con passione e professionalità dalle bibliotecarie del Settore manoscritti e libri antichi e racchiude tante sorprese e opere inedite e mai esposte in precedenza. Interamente dedicata ai tarocchi, nelle sue varie espressioni, è, poi, un’intera bacheca, allestita col materiale scelto per importanza storica, artistica e culturale dai responsabili del Museo dei tarocchi, sorprendentemente ricco per la varietà e l’originalità dei materiali che conserva e che per la prima volta saranno esposti in questa sede prestigiosa. Le ricerche si sono concentrate, in particolare, su alcuni fondi della Biblioteca Universitaria appartenuti a collezionisti competenti e appassionati, come lo speziale Ubaldo Zanetti, che ci ha lasciato una vera miniera di documenti preziosi per conoscere la vita quotidiana bolognese del ceto popolare e di quello nobile, di cui fu attento osservatore: otto dei trentasette pezzi esposti sono tratti dalla sua collezione. Da ricordare poi alcuni opuscoli di Giulio Cesare Croce, il poeta della vita cittadina e del suo popolino, questa volta tratti dal fondo Jacopo Bartolomeo Beccari.Nel panorama dei giochi e passatempi non poteva mancare quello che ha sempre avuto un gran numero di appassionati in Italia e in Europa: il gioco degli scacchi. Lo testimonia l’abbondanza della manualistica rappresentata da ben quattro volumi presenti nella nostra Mostra. Accanto agli scacchi non potevano mancare i giochi matematici: il più noto autore , anzi l’autore del primo trattato organico di matematica e geometria pubblicato a stampa (Venezia 1494), è sicuramente Luca Pacioli, di cui la BUB conserva il ms.250, De viribus quantitatis, datato sec. XVI.
Ma se documenti e libri sui giochi matematici, gli scacchi, i giochi da tavolo popolari e quelli di conversazione praticati dal ceto nobiliare, sono abbastanza diffusi nei fondi storici di questa Biblioteca, il ritrovamento di una raccolta di carte da gioco didattiche, rappresenta una vera novità. Nel fondo Francesco Zambeccari, il conte bolognese che lasciò in eredità la sua libreria personale alla Biblioteca nel 1752, sono stati identificati ben 7 diversi mazzi di carte di vari argomenti, destinati all’educazione dei giovani nobili, raccolta finora sconosciuta, catalogata ed esposta per la prima volta. Non poteva mancare in Mostra la rappresentazione artistica dei passatempi e dei giochi che molto interesse suscitava negli artisti: è infatti esposta la stupenda incisione che il veneziano Bartolomeo Crivellari trasse, due secoli dopo, dall’affresco cinquecentesco di Nicolò dell’Abate dedicato al gioco dei tarocchi, a decoro di una sala di Palazzo Poggi, fino alla fine degli anni ’90 appartenente alla Biblioteca. Si ricordano quindi un manoscritto di Ulisse Aldrovandi, che contiene, secondo il suo tipico metodo di lavoro, un piccolo trattato sistematico sui giochi, dalla definizione stessa del gioco per proseguire con una sorta di classificazione fra giochi pubblici e giochi privati, a cominciare proprio dai tarocchi. E un piccolo, delizioso libretto, che ci riporta addirittura al gossip dell’epoca. La domanda è: come trascorrono la serata gli ospiti che il nobile Filippo Guastavillani ha invitato a cena? La risposta è: giocando con la sorte. Al visitatore lasciamo, dunque, scoprire il contenuto del sorprendente volumetto. Ma in tema di curiosità come non ricordare un foglio volante manoscritto del fondo Zanetti e quindi sicuramente anteriore al 1769, anno della sua morte, in cui sono delineate, di mano dello stesso speziale, le corrispondenze fra le carte dei tarocchi e i loro significati: la testimonianza è interessante, in quanto sembra dimostrare che la pratica della cartomanzia era largamente diffusa a livello popolare, già ben prima della formalizzazione teorica di questa tecnica predittiva che si fa risalire all’occultista francese Jean-Baptiste Alliette nel 1770. Ma, sicuramente, il pezzo più curioso di tutti, sempre ritrovato fra i manoscritti del fondo Zanetti, è una carta da gioco bolognese tagliata a metà che si trovava in una lettera indirizzata allo speziale, e doveva servire come segno di riconoscimento per chi era in possesso dell’altra mezza figura, in una storia davvero intrigante che forse non avremmo mai scoperto, se non avessimo cercato in quel fondo, quasi disperatamente, anche qualche mazzo di carte del ‘700. Sappiamo, infatti, che le carte bolognesi erano molto ricercate all’epoca e talvolta venivano fornite di contrabbando per il loro costo elevato o venivano utilizzate per pagare debiti o lasciate in pegno. Infine, un vero tripudio di carte di tarocchi, antiche e moderne, provenienti da tutto il mondo, insieme a curiosi oggetti e opere d’arte aventi come tema i tarocchi, non mancheranno di incuriosire e interessare i visitatori di questa nuova iniziativa espositiva, che la Biblioteca Universitaria, dopo l’impensabile grandissimo successo della Mostra sull’Alchimia, tenuta da febbraio ad aprile di questo intenso 2014, ha voluto offrire ai suoi numerosi utenti ed amici. La Mostra è corredata da un pregevole Catalogo, che contiene le relazioni del convegno e le colte ed esaustive schede dei pezzi antichi e manoscritti esposti.
Orario:
lunedì- venerdì dalle 10.00 alle 18.00;
sabato dalle 9,30 alle 13.00;
domenica e festivi chiuso. Ingresso libero.
Per informazioni tel. 0512088300/306


22-11-2014

BIBLIOTECA UNIVERSITARIA BOLOGNA
Aula Magna
6 Dicembre 2014, ore 9.30
Convegno
"TAROCCHI... SEI SECOLI DI STORIA, ARTE E SIMBOLI"
Intervengono:
Biancastella Antonino, Direttrice Biblioteca Universitaria Bologna
Morena Poltronieri, Direttrice Museo dei Tarocchi
Ernesto Fazioli
Alberto Beltrami
Giovanni Pelosini
Andrea Vitali
Girolamo Zorli

Opening Mostra ore 12.00
"TAROCCHI, SCACCHI, ENIGMI; passatempi cortesi e popolari nei fondi della B.U.B."

Visita guidata a cura di patrizia Moscatelli.
Via Zamboni 35, Bologna
Per informazioni: 051-2088300/306

In occasione della mostra verrà presentato un bellissimo gioco inedito "NUOVO GIOCO DELL'HONORE", firmato dal pittore e intagliatore bolognese Floriano Dal Buono (1599-1647) e non riportato finora fra le sue opere. La tavola è dedicata dall'editore, il libraio Antonio Maria Magnani che gestiva una bottega all'insegna del Pellegrino, a un Bartolomeo di Gerolamo Baldi.
Ingresso libero



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