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Senza titolo - Untitled (Gioco dell'Oca - Game of the Goose - Jeu de l'Oie) 
"Da una porta partir' più pellegrini......."  
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primo autore: Spada Valerio 
secondo autore: Spada Valerio 
anno: 1650 
luogo: Italia-Firenze (?) 
periodo: XVII secolo (3°/4) 
percorso: Percorso di 63 caselle numerate 
materiale: carta (paper) (papier) 
dimensioni: 900X685 (462X330) 
stampa: Stampa su legno (bois gravé) (woodcut) 
luogo acquisto:  
data acquisto:  
dimensioni confezione:  
numero caselle: 63 
categoria: Oca  
tipo di gioco: Gioco Oca Classico (63 caselle) Verticale 
editore: Non indicato 
stampatore: Non indicato 
proprietario: Collezione Rothschild 
autore delle foto: Waddesdon The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust) 
numero di catalogo: 1175 
descrizione: Gioco di 63 caselle numerate, spirale, antiorario, centripeto. Titolo non riportato sul tavoliere.
REGOLE: non riportate sul tavoliere.
CASELLE: mute.
Al centro poemetto in versi tratto da "La Sfinge, Enimmi" di Antonio Malatesti, una raccolta di enigmi pubblicata nel 1640/43. La soluzione di questo enigma è: "Il gioco dell'oca".

"DA una Porta partir’ più pellegrini,
Per arriuare a vn luogo desiato,
Spinti dall’ossa, ch’ han negli occhi il fato,
A andar di trotto, como i Vetturini.
NON andauan’ insieme ma vicini,
E nell’vrtarsi si toglieano il lato.
E chi vn augel trouaua, era forzato
Il paßo a raddoppiar per quei confini.
UN a vn mal’ paßo cadde, e gli dispiacque,
Vn altro ebbe dal vin gran nocumento,
E un altro aßai maggior l’ebbe dall’acque.
UN per la uia smarrißi vn restò dentro
Vn carcer chiuso, vn senza vita giacque,
E vn sol di tanti giunse a saluamento."

D'une porte plusieurs Pèlerins partirent,
Pour arriver à un lieu désiré
Poussés par les os qui ont le destin dans les yeux
Pour aller au trot , comme les cochers
Quoique proches, ils n'allaient pas ensemble,
Et, en se heurtant, ils s'écartaient de côté
Celui qui rencontrait un oiseau était obligé
De redoubler le pas dans ces confins
L'un chut d'un faux pas, et cela lui déplut
Un autre, du vin, eut grand dommage
Et un autre, des eaux, l'eut davantage
L'un par les chemins s'égara, l'un resta enfermé à l'intérieur
D'une prison, un autre gît sans vie,
Et, un seul d'entre tous parvint au salut.

"From a door lots of pilgrims left
To get to a desired place.
Pushed by the bones, that had in the eyes the destiny (fate)
to trot like coach drivers.
They didn’t go together, but were close,
And bumping each other, they moved aside
And whoever found a bird, was forced to
Double their step for the borders.
One fell from a badly made step, and was upset,
Another had a big damage from the wine,
And another had a bigger one from the waters.
One got lost on the way, one got locked
In prison, one lay without life
And only one of many came to salvation."


REFERENZA 1
Accession N°2669.1.20 Waddesdon-The Rothschild Collection (The National Trust).
Object title: "Goose Game with a Poem starting "By One Door More Pilgrims Leave"
Original Language Title: (Da una Porta partir più pellegrini...).
Object type: board games; etchings/intaglio prints/prints.
Primary Maker: Valerio Spada; Italian; b.1613, d.1688.
Primary Maker Role: Attributed to/Artist or maker.
Secondary Maker: Valerio Spada (Italian, b.1613, d.1688).
Secondary Maker Role: Engraver.
Medium: etching and engraving on paper.
Dimensions: mm. 685 x 900 (mount size).
Media Materials: laid paper/paper (fiber product)/materials; printing ink/ink/coating (material)/materials; cardboard/pasteboard/paper (fiber product)/materials.
Physical Description: single sheet mounted on cardboard, image size: 462 x 330 (sheet trimmed to or within plate mark).
Primary Production Technique: etching (printing process); engraving (printing process).
Primary Prod Date: Circa 1650 {nd}.
Primary Prod Date Notes: Dated from fashion.
Place of Production: Florence?/Italy.
Language Keywords: Italian.
Brief Description: Printed board game of the goose game, with a poem starting "By One Door More Pilgrims Leave". Classic goose game with 63 spaces, with a goose on normal spaces such as 5 and 9. In the corners, there are landscape vignettes, including geese hunting and herding. The entrance to the first square is through a ruined arch. In the centre, men and women play a goose board game amongst ruins. Many of the squares are decorated with flowers or rosettes. The image is etched and the text is engraved.
Signature Date description: signed in the plate, lower right: V Spada [FV?].
Signature Marks Y N display: V Spada [FV?]
Signature Marks Type Y N display: Signature; No inscriptions.
Signature Marks Notes Y N display: lower right, in the plate.
Location of Publisher’s Premises: XXX
Location of Publisher’s Premises Notes: XXX
Curatorial Commentary: The artist is probably Valerio Spada, an etcher active in Florence.
Research Keywords: Humour; Family
Genre: Fête Galante
Subject People name only: XXX
Subject Role: XXX
Subject Category: Architecture/Architectural Features; Architecture/Ruins; Animals/Birds/Goose; Figures/Child; Figures/Female; Figures/Group; Figures/Male; Nature, Landscape & The Elements/Flora/Flowers; Objects/Sports & Games/Dice or Board Game; Everyday Life/Gaming & Sport/Dice & Board Games; Nature, Landscape & The Elements/Countryside; Nature, Landscape & The Elements/Flora/Trees & Plants; Nature, Landscape & The Elements/Flora/Trees & Plants/Pine Tree; Everyday Life/Relationships/Family; Work & Occupations/Agriculture & Fishing;
Subject Place: XXX
Subject Event: XXX
Subject Date: XXX
Documentation with notes: XXX
Related Literature: XXX
Related Literature Notes: XXX
External File Notes: XXX
Cataloguer: Phillippa Plock

REFERENZA 2
This classic goose game, the oldest game in the collection, is almost certainly by Valerio Spada (1613-1688), and probably dates from the middle of the 17th century, consistent with the fashions depicted. Primarily employed by the Medici of Florence, Spada was a draughtsman, calligrapher and engraver, known particularly for his frontispieces, book illustrations, views of Florence and drawings of everyday-life. He depicted geese, the suppliers of quills, in some of his beautiful illustrated manuscripts [Massar 1981: 251-275 and 319-344]. The game is of vertical (portrait) format, as is usual for early Italian Goose games. The playing spaces are entirely normal, with the non-significant spaces mostly having flowers or rosettes as decoration. In the corners are landscape vignettes, including hunting of geese with guns. In the centre, men and women play at a goose board, with other scenes involving geese in the background.
The game is characterised by a poem of 14-line sonnet form, beginning ‘Da una porta partir’ più pellegrini’. This describes a pilgrimage (fancifully undertaken by the players of the game). They leave by a single gate (the first space) but do not travel together, though they are near each other. They are driven by the bones in whose eyes is fate (the dice).The poem refers to the doubling when a bird (a goose space) is encountered, and to the perils of wine (the inn), of water (the well), of incarceration (the prison), of losing the way (the labyrinth) and of lying lifeless (death). Of the several pilgrims, only one will reach salvation (the winning space). This poem is of interest as confirming that the game was seen as a metaphor of life. Thierry Depaulis notes (2010 private communication) that the sonnet is taken from La Sfinge, Enimmi by Antonio Malatesti (II, no. 86), published in 1640-4: the Carabba edition is accessible at www.archive.org17. The solution of the enigma is given at page 155 as ‘The Game of the Goose’. Several poems by Malatesti were illustrated by Valerio Spada in Varie Poesie di diversi Autori [see Massar 1981: 259]. Both men belonged to the Accademia degli Apatisti, a literary circle founded in Florence in 1635. The representation in the central area of a Goose game in progress recalls paintings by Caravaggio and his followers, such as Bartolomeo Manfredi, in which scenes of game playing occur. In Northern Europe, such scenes often were intended as warnings against the danger of game playing. In 16th-century Italy, games were part of the culture of the Court and aristocratic games were often depicted in allegories of love [Langdon 2001: 42-65]. The Spada game was clearly intended for such a milieu and the men and women he depicts recall the soudards and courtesans of Caravaggio and Manfredi. Perhaps the game, with its theme of Christian pilgrimage, was thought a more suitable recreation than the gambling games so popular in Florence at the time. Indeed, on this interpretation, the Game of Goose could be regarded as a moral diversion, though on a small scale, comparable to the elaborate devotional books dedicated to the Quarant’ Ore, directed at resisting the temptations of Carnival. As if to underline the point, two other ‘Games of Goose’ are illustrated in the background of the central space. In one, young men compete to climb a pole to reach a goose secured at the top in a cage. In the other, more barabarous, a living goose is suspended from a rope by its feet and is attacked with a sword by by the young ‘players’ in blindfolds, until one of them succeeds in cutting off its head and gaining the prize. [Bougeâtre 1971: 244-245]: this diversion continued to be practised in Italy well into the 20th century [Kertzer 1990: 132 and 152]. A moral interpretation of this kind is not incompatible with Spada’s reputation: he was known for his decorum and ability to resist the pleasures of wine [Massar 1981: 254]. That said, the comical sight of the Christian knight mounted upon a large goose at the start of the game must have reduced the chances of the engraving being taken as a wholly serious moral imperative!
(Plock, Phillippa - Seville Adrian)

REFERENZA 3
"Goose Game with a Poem starting 'From a Door Lots of Pilgrims Left'", c. 1650, attributed to Valerio Spada (b. 1613, d. 1688), Florence, Italy; etching and engraving. Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (Rothschild Family Trust).

This Italian game is the oldest in the exhibition. The traditional Game of the Goose is thought to have originated in Italy and the vertical format is characteristic of early Italian examples. The pictorial imagery and the verse explain 'why' and 'how' the game is played. In the centre of the course a family is depicted playing the game together. The poem likens the game to a pilgrimage. All players enter through a single gate but do not travel together. They encounter perils along the way and only one pilgrim will reach salvation. The pilgrim is visualised as a man riding a giant goose, appearing at the beginning and again at the end, with his back to the players, entering through the gate.
(Jacobs Rachel)


bibliografia: 1) BLAU, J.L. : "The Christian Interpretation of the Cabala in the Renaissance, Columbia University Press,1944.
2) BROWNE, Sir Thomas: "Pseudodoxia Epidemica, ChXII", 1650.
3) BUIJNSTERS, P.J. and Buijnsters-Smets,L. : "Papertoys", Zwolle, Waanders, 2005.
4) CARRERA, P. : "Il Gioco degli Scacchi", Militello, page 25, 1617.
5) CULIN, S. : "Chess and Playing Cards", University of Pennsylvania, pages 843-848, 1895.
6) D’ALLEMAGNE,H. R. : "Le Noble Jeu de l’Oie", Paris, Libraire Gruend, 1950.
7) DOMINI, D. : (in) "La Vite e il Vino" (exhibition catalogue), Fondazione Lungarotti, pages 37-38, 1999.
8) GIRARD A. R. and QUETEL, C. : "L'histoire de France racontée par le jeu de l'oie", Paris, Balland/Massin, 1982.
9) HANNAS, L. : "The English Jigsaw Puzzle", London, Wayland, page 115, 1972.
10) HIMMELHEBER, G. : "Spiele – Gesellschaftspiele aus einem Jahrtausend",Deutscher Kunstverlag, 1972.
11) HUFMANN C.C. :"Elizabethan Impressions: John Wolfe and His Press, New York, AMS Press; 1988.
12) MASCHERONI S. and TINTI, B. : "Il Gioco dell'Oca", Milano, Bompiani, 1981.
13) MENESTRIER, C. F. : "Bibliotheque Curieuse et Instructive", Trevoux, page 196, 1704.
14) MURRAY H. J. R. : "A History of Board Games Other Than Chess", Oxford University Press, pp 142-143, 1952.
15) SEVILLE, Adrian:"Tradition and Variation in the Game of Goose", in: "Board Games in Academia III", Firenze, Aprile 1999. (aggiornamento del 2005).
16) SEVILLE, Adrian: "The sociable Game of the Goose", in "Board Games Studies Colloquia XI", 23-26 Aprile 2008, Lisbona - Portogallo. 2008.
17) SEVILLE, Adrian: "The Royal Game of the Goose four hundred years of printed Board Games". Catalogue of an Exhibition at the Grolier Club, February 23 - May 14, 2016.
18) VON WILCKENS, L. : "Spiel, Spiele, Kinderspiel (exhibition catalogue)", Germanisches Nationalmuseums, Nuernberg, page 18, 1985.
19) WHITEHAUSE, F. R. B. : "Table Games of Georgian and Victorian Days", London, Peter Garnett, 1951.
20) ZOLLINGER, M. : "Zwei Unbekannte Regeln des Gansespiels", Board Game Studies 6, Leiden University, 2003.
21)Catalogo Mostra: “Le jeu de l’oie au musée du jouet”, Ville de Poissy 2000.
22) DAMSTE', Christine Sinninghe - BUMA, Hopperus:"The History of the Game of the Goose", Exhibition Museum Joure , 30 October 2004 – 25 February 2005.
23) NEGRI, Ilio - VERCELLONI, Virgilio: "I giochi di dadi d'azzardo e di passatempo dei gentiluomini e dei pirati" Introduzione di Caterina Santoro, Lerici Milano 1958.
24) MILANO, Alberto:"GIOCHI DA SALOTTO. GIOCHI DA OSTERIA nella vita milanese dal Cinquecento all'Ottocento". Catalogo Mostra Palazzo Morando, Via S. Andrea 6 Milano. (Con la collaborazione di Giuliano Crippa). Edizioni Gabriele Mazzotta, 2012.
25) JACOBS, Rachel: "Playing, Learning, Flirting: Printed Board Games from 18th-Century France". Catalogue exhibition of French eighteenth-century Board Games, 28 March – 28 October 2012, Waddesdon Manor, The Rothschild Collection (Rothschild Family Trust). Rachel Jacobs, Curator.



 
  "Tradition and Variation in the Game of Goose" (A. Seville)
 
 
   
 
   

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