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Wheeling 
A New and Exciting Game for Cyclists 
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primo autore: Non indicato 
secondo autore: Jaques John&Son 
anno: 1900 
luogo: Inghilterra-Londra 
periodo: XX secolo (1°/4) 
percorso: Percorso di 100 caselle numerate 
materiale: carta incollata su cartone ripiegato in 4 
dimensioni: 365X740 
stampa: Cromolitografia 
luogo acquisto: Francia-Beaufort 
data acquisto: 29-12-2004
dimensioni confezione:  
numero caselle: 100 
categoria: Automobile, cicli e motocicli 
tipo di gioco: Gioco di percorso  
editore: Published by J. Jaques & Son. 102, Hatton Garden, London E. C. 
stampatore: Published by J. Jaques & Son. 102, Hatton Garden, London E. C. 
proprietario: Collezione L. Ciompi - A. Seville 
autore delle foto: L. Ciompi - A. Seville 
numero di catalogo: 301 
descrizione: Gioco di percorso di 100 caselle, spirale, orario, centripeto.
REGOLE: non riportate sul tavoliere.
CASELLE: mute.

REFERENZA 1
"Wheeling". (Victoria&Albert Museum) The game shows the adventures and mishaps that sometimes befall cyclists. The playing area has 100 spaces, and the finishing one is the Anchor pub in Ripley. Up to eight players can take part, and each has a lead playing piece. These are in the shape of male and female cyclists and were probably made by Britains Ltd, a company famous for its lead figures.
Physical description
Design: chromolithograph mounted on card; three folds.
N°of squares: 100
Squares illustrated: some
Square numbering: all
Squares titled: none
Subject of starting square: gathering of cyclists
Subject of ending square: The anchor at Ripley (pub)
Place of Origin: London
Date: 1900-1910
Artist/maker: John Jaques & Son Ltd.
Materials and Techniques: Chromolithographed paper on card
Dimensions: Height: 37.2 cm; width: 75 cm
Object history note: The game show the adventures and mishaps which may befall cyclist. Lead pieces were probably made by Britains Ltd, a company which did produce flats for games as well as the hollows cast soldiers.
Historical context note
Rewards: forward movement, extra turns
Forfeits: backward movement, missed turns
N°of Players: 6-8
Descriptive line: Chromolithographed race game, Wheeling, made in England by John Jaques & Son between 1900 and 1910.

REFERENZA 2
"Wheeling (Tour de roue) édité par J. Jacques&Son au début du XXe siècle, est imprimé par chromolithographie. Ce jeu, qui comporte aussi des pions en plomb représentant des cyclistes, a comme sous-titre: "Jeu Nouveau et Excitant pour les Cyclistes". Il met en scène diverses aventures et mésaventures survenant à ces derniers.
(GOODFELLOW Caroline)

REFERENZA 3
"Wheeling was published by J. Jacques&Son at the beginning of the 20th century and was printed by chromolithography. This game, which also has lead markers in the shape of cyclists, is subtitled "A New and Exciting Game for Cyclists. It shows many of the adventures and mishaps that befall bicycle riders.
(GOODFELLOW Caroline)

REFERENZA 4
Game 41: Wheeling
Wheeling. London: J. Jaques & Son, 102, Hatton Garden, E.C., [c. 1900]. Chromolithograph, 37 x 76 cm., on four-panel folding board, the reverse having a printed chess board and a halma board.
Ref.: Ciompi/Seville 0301.
Jaques of London claims to be the oldest surviving manufacturer of games and sports goods in the world, tracing its origin to Thomas Jaques, recorded in 1795 as a manufacturer of goods in ivory, bone and hardwoods, including Tunbridge ware. The copyright on this game was registered in 1896; several editions, all called Wheeling (an old name for cycling) were published up to the 1920s. This example is from the boxed set The New Century Compendium of Games. The goal is to reach The Anchor at space 100, which was (and still is) a public house at Ripley, a village in Surrey on the road to Portsmouth, 22 miles south west of London. The Anchor was a favorite destination for cyclists from London as it was a convenient and scenic ride. The player has to throw 1, 3 or 6 with one dice in order to start and “pump up his tyres”; thereafter, two dice are used. The game, though not obviously derived from Goose, is like it in having a regular sequence of favorable spaces, e.g., at each oil-can, a player can move on 5 more spaces. On the early part of the track are spaces that entitle the player to receive a ”ticket” (a printed card) for a bell or whistle; for a pneumatic outfit; or for a lamp. These tickets enable the player to avoid being penalized at later hazards, such as at space 26 (a sharp tack), and unless provided with a pneumatic outfit, the player must go back to 10 and get one. But one hazard is final: space 90, where the player smashes his machine and has to retire from the game. It is significant that, in order to make a good game, many of the structural features of Goose are present, though with different details.
(Adrian Seville)


bibliografia: 1) GOODFELLOW, Caroline: "Jeux de société. Le guide du collectionneur des jeux de société depuis le XVIIIe siècle jusqu’à nos jours", (Edizione francese) Carrousel MS, 2001.
2) GOODFELLOW, Caroline: "A Collector's Guide to Games and Puzzles" Secaucus, New Jersey, Chartwell Books-London, Quintet Publishing Limited 1991.
3) Catalogo Mostra: “Le jeu de l’oie au musée du jouet”, Ville Poissy 2000.
3) SEVILLE, Adrian: "The Royal Game of the Goose four hundred years of printed Board Games". Catalogue of an Exhibition at the Grolier Club, February 23 - May 14, 2016.

 
  The Development of the English Board Game, 1770-1850 (Caroline G. Goodfellow)
 
 
   
 
   

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