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Science in Sport or the Pleasures of Astronomy  
A New&Instructive Pastime, Revised and Approved by Mrs. Bryan, Blackheath. 
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primo autore: Anonimo 
secondo autore: Wallis 
anno: 1804/15 
luogo: Inghilterra-Londra 
periodo: XIX secolo (1°/4) 
percorso: Percorso di 35 caselle numerate 
materiale: carta incollata su tela (engraving on paper with linen backing)  
dimensioni: 472X573 
stampa: Litografia colorata (hand coloured engraving)  
luogo acquisto:  
data acquisto:  
dimensioni confezione:  
numero caselle: 35 
categoria: Scienze naturali ed applicate 
tipo di gioco: Gioco di percorso  
editore: Published December 17th, 1804 by the Proprietor, John Wallis, No 16 Ludgate Street 
stampatore: Printed by Edward Wallis 42 Skinner Street, Snow Hill, London 
proprietario: Collezione A. Seville 
autore delle foto: A. Seville 
numero di catalogo: 1384 
descrizione: Gioco di 35 caselle numerate, ottagonale, orario, centripeto. Al centro Flamstead House. Nonostante l'insegnamento delle Scienze nel XIX secolo non fosse trascurato, esistono meno esempi di giochi dedicati a questo settore rispetto a quelli per la geografia e la storia. Questo elegante esemplare riporta al centro l'illustrazione dell'osservatorio di Greenwich che diede il nome al primo meridiano. Intorno troviamo ritratti di Tolomeo, Tycho Brahe, Copernico e Newton. Il gioco venne rivisto dalla signora Bryan di Blackheath che gestiva a Londra una scuola per l'insegnamento delle scienze alle ragazze. Il fatto che non facesse sconti a nessuna delle allieve è dimostrato dal regolamento:
- Casella 6, la prigione della Contea questo è il posto riservato a coloro che prestano più attenzione al movimento delle palle da biliardo che a quello dei pianeti. Non importa quanto sia grave il tuo caso, resta fermo fino a quando qualcuno prenderà il tuo posto.
- Casella 15, "L'uomo nella Luna" : è opinione ridicola di alcune persone ignoranti che ci sia un uomo sulla luna, con un cane e un fascio di legna che ne mangia vari pezzi causandone la forma irregolare e che questa tuttavia si rigeneri ogni mese. Imparate la lezione e tornate alla casella 13 (le fasi della Luna) per leggerne la descrizione.
REGOLE: al centro a destra.
CASELLE: mute.

REFERENZA 1
"Science in Sport or the Pleasures of Astronomy". (V&A Museum).
This 1815 board game is a reissue of a race game first published by John Wallis in 1804. The 35 playing spaces have portraits of astronomers and representations of astronomical phenomena. In addition to facts about the nine known planets and thier orbits, the game also features fiction (the Man in the Moon) , behaviour (the Studious Boy and the Blockhead), signs of the Zodiac, comets and rainbows.
Physical description
Design: engraving, coloured by hand, 15 sections mounted on linen; numbered in a clockwise direction from the lower right hand corner.
N°of squares: 35
Squares illustrated: all
Square numbering: all
Squares titled: all in booklet
Subject of starting square: The Sun
Subject of ending square: Flamstead House, Grand Observatory
Place of Origin: London
Date: ca. 1815
Artist/maker: Wallis, Edward
Materials and Techniques: Hand-coloured engraving, mounted on linen
Dimensions: Length: 47.2 cm; width: 57.3 cm
Object history note: re-issue of the game first published by John Wallis in 1804
Historical context note
Rewards: extra turns and forward movement
Forfeits: missing turns, backward movement and the reciting of details from the booklet as listed
N°of Players: any
Equipment required: teetotum, markers (pyramids) and four matching coloured counters each
Rules:
SCIENCE IN SPORT OR THE PLEASURES OF ASTRONOMY A NEW GAME REVISED AND APPROVED BY MRS. BRYAN BLACKHEATH, LONDON PRINTED FOR E WALLIS 42 SKINNER STREET, SNOW HILL BY T DAVIS 117 MINORIES.
Booklet lists each medallion and indicates addition rules to playing the game which are not accounted for on the playing sheet. These are mainly missing turns or reciting information.
THE LAWS OF THE GAME
1. Each player must have a pyramid and four counters of the same colour.
2. The first player is to be determined by spinning the teetotum; the highest spinner to be the first player etc.
3. The first player must road the introduction aloud before he begins to play.
4. The first player is to spin and according to the number turned up on the teetotum, he is to place his pyramid: thus if he turns up 3, he is to place his pyramid at No. 3.
5. After the first player has spun, the rest are to spin in the order determined by Law 2.
6. The number turned up at each spinning is to be added on to that on which the players pyramid stands: thus if a player whose pyramid stands on No. 3, spins and the teetotum turns up 4, he must place his pyramid at No. 7 and so on till some one arrives at 35, who wins the game.
7. If the last spin does not exactly make up 35, but goes beyond it, the player is to go back as many as he exceeds that number and try his fortune again till some one arrives at the lucky number.
8. When a player is to stop one or more turns, he must place as many counters as he is to stop turns on the number he arrives at and when his turn of spinning comes he is to take up a counter instead of spinning and so on until they are all redeemed, when he may proceed.
Introductory Observations are engraved on the playing sheet.
*First published by John Wallis in 1804 and reissued by Edward Wallis. The 35 squares have portraits of astronomers and representations of astronomical phenomena. At the time, nine planets and their movements around the sun were known. Intermingled with facts are compartments dealing with fiction (the Man in the Moon) , behavior (the Studious Boy and the Blockhead), signs of the Zodiac, comets and rainbows, and astronomers.
Rules placement: on the playing sheet and in booklet printed by T Davis 117 Minories
Descriptive line: Hand coloured astronomical race game, Science in Sport, published in England by Edward Wallis about 1815.

REFERENZA 2
WHITEHOUSE, Francis Reginald Beaman, (pag. 35): PLEASURES OF ASTRONOMY (Science in Sport or the). A new & Instructive Pastime, Revised and approved by Mrs. Bryan, Blackheath. Published December 17th, 1804 by the Proprietor, John Wallis, No 16 Ludgate Street, London, of whom may be had Science in Sport or the Pleasures of NATURAL PIHLOSOPHY, an Entertaining Game. (Note the spelling mistake.)
An engraving size 22 ½ in X 17 ¼ in. The author has two copies of this game:
(a) Uncoloured and mounted in 9 sections on linen.
(b) Hand-coloured and in 15 sections contained in slip-in case with gilt title "WALLIS'S GAME ASTRONOMY”.
The book of rules printed by Biggs & Co., Crane Street, Fleet Street, 1805. The 35 pictures are described and penalties imposed, among them No 6 “The County Gaol-this is the place for those who attend to the motions of Billiard Balls more than to the motions of the planets". The centre portion of the engraved sheet shows in five circles "FLAMSTEAD HOUSE", COPERNICUS, TYCHO BRAHE, SIR ISAAC NEWTON, PTOLEMY.

REFERENZA 3
Game 50: The Pleasures of Astronomy
Margaret Bryan. Science in Sport or the Pleasures of Astronomy. London: E[dward] Wallis, 42 Skinner Street, Snow Hill [c. 1815]. Copper engraving with original hand color, 45 x 57 cm., dissected and laid onto linen in 3 x 5 panels.
Refs.: Ciompi/Seville 1384; Whitehouse, p. 35.
This fine engraving shows as its central, winning space the original observatory at Greenwich, London known as Flamsteed House, from which the prime meridian is defined; the building was designed by Sir Christopher Wren for Charles II in 1675. It is flanked by portrait medallions of Ptolemy, Tycho Brahe, Copernicus and Sir Isaac Newton. Around it are definitions of technical terms in astronomy. The game has a 12-page book of rules, with notes on each of the 35 spaces. The game was ”revised and approved by Mrs Bryan of Blackheath.” As Lucy Inglis notes:
Margaret Bryan worked between 1797 and 1816 in the fields of astronomy and mathematics. She ran a school for girls in Blackheath, London, at Bryan House where she lived with her husband and her two daughters. She believed mathematics and astronomy were important subjects for girls as well as boys, and the girls who attended her seminary were schooled in what she termed "natural philosophy". Her method of education was so popular amongst the children and their parents that Margaret felt encouraged to publish by subscription, in August of 1797, her Compendious System of Astronomy. The celebrated mathematician Charles Hutton recommended her lectures and she went on to publish more works, including Lectures on Natural Philosophy in 1806.
Bryan’s teaching methods did not spare the inattentive:
Space 6: The County Gaol - This is the place for those who attend more to the motion of billiard balls, more than to the motions of the planets. However hard you think your case / Stay here till someone takes your place.
Space 12: A Blockhead (a wooden head complete with fool’s cap) - Whoever is so unfortunate as to fall upon this number loses his chance of the game.
Space 15: The Man in the Moon - It is the ridiculous idea of some ignorant people that there is a man in the moon, with a dog and a bundle of wood, who causes the different appearances of it by eating it away, while they say it grows back again each month. That you may know better, go back to No. 13 [the phases of the moon] and read to yourself the description that you will find there.
The science is both scrupulous and up to date:
Space 16: The Stars - The fixed stars are bodies which, like the sun, shine with their own light. They are, from late observations, even supposed to be suns, each of them having a system of planets which revolve round him, but the immensity of their distances is such that it has not been ascertained by any method other than conjecture.... Observe likewise in this plate that faint streak of light in the heavens called the milky way which Dr Herschel has found to be an assemblage of stars, he having discovered many thousands.
This would have been a fun game to play.
(Adrian Seville)

REFERENZA 4
"Science in Sport, or, The Pleasures of Astronomy: A New Instructive Pastime", London: Edward Wallis, 1804, 57 x 44 cm. (Yale University GV1199 .S35 1804.).
HOW TO PLAY THE GAME: Margaret Bryan (fl. 1795–1816) ran a girl’s school in Blackheath, London, and was the author of a number of popular works on science. The publisher Edward Wallis likely felt that her association with this game would be a testament to its accuracy, as well as highlight its suitability for both boys and girls. The board has thirty-five numbered squares depicting astronomical objects, instruments, and
principles, as well as portraits of astronomers (Ptolemy, Tycho Brahe, Nicholas Copernicus, and Isaac Newton). The center panel depicts the Royal Observatory (Flamsteed House) in Greenwich, England, from which the prime meridian is defined.
The first player who landed there could assume the title of Astronomer Royal, but there were hazards along the way. Landing on square 15, for example, with its depiction of the The Man in the Moon - “the ridiculous idea of some ignorant people”- would send the player back to square 13, to read about The Phases of the Moon, so “that [he or she] may know better.”
(Patrons)

Exhibitions:
- "The Royal Game of the Goose four hundred years of printed Board Games". Exhibition at the Grolier Club, February 23 - May 14, 2016 (Prof. Adrian Seville).

- "Instruction and Delight: Children's Games from the Ellen and Arthur Liman Collection" (Yale Center for British Art, 17 January-23 May, 2019).

bibliografia: 1) WHITEHAUSE, F.R.B.:"Table Games of Georgian and Victorian Days", London, Peter Garnett, 1951.
2) GOODFELLOW, Caroline: "A Collector's Guide to Games and Puzzles" Secaucus, New Jersey, Chartwell Books-London, Quintet Publishing Limited 1991.
3) GOODFELLOW, Caroline:"The Development of the English Board Game, 1770-1850", in Board Games Studies 1, 1998.
4) GOODFELLOW, Caroline:"Jeux de société. Le guide du collectionneur des jeux de société depuis le XVIIIe siècle jusqu’à nos jours", (Edizione francese) Carrousel MS, 2001.
5) GOODFELLOW, Caroline:"How We Played: Games From Childhood Past", History Press, 2012.
6) LIMAN, Ellen: "Georgian and Victorian Board Games: The Liman Collection", Pointed Leaf Press, 2017 (pages 152, 154).
6) NORCIA, Megan A.: "Gaming Empire in Children's British Board Games, 1836-1860". Studies in Childhood, 1700 to the Present. Routledge, 2019.
7) SEVILLE, Adrian: "L'arte dei giochi da tavolo. Oltre un secolo di storia e divertimento dalla fine del Settecento all'inizio del Novecento." Edizioni White Star, 2019.


 
  "The Development of the English Board Game", 1770-1850 (Caroline G. Goodfellow)
 
  Instructional Games. "Table Games of Georgian and Victorian Days". (Francis Reginald Beaman, Whitehause)
   
 
   

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